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Access to CPR and defibrillators

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Access to CPR and defibrillators

Information on providing CPR in an emergency situation and how to access defibrillators across the county.

What is CPR?

CPR stands for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. It combines chest compressions and rescue breaths to give a person the best chance of survival following a cardiac arrest. Watch the video below and follow the link to learn more about this.

CPR training and resources

The below links will direct you to CPR training and resources that are available.

What is a defibrillator?

A defibrillator is a device that which when used gives a high energy electric shock to the heart of an individual who is in cardiac arrest. This action is called defibrillation, and it plays an essential role in trying to save the life of someone who is having a heart attack. A defibrillator may also be called an AED (Automated External Defibrillator) or a PAD (Publicly Available Defib). Watch the video below and follow the link to learn more about this.

Where is my nearest defibrillator?

In case of emergency, always ring 999 as they will direct you to the nearest defibrillator.

Please note that these links will not be the most up to date record, will not list all defibrillators, and not all are available to the public 24 hours a day 7 days a week.

Getting a defibrillator

How to get or install a defibrillator in a place or for your organisation.

Guidance for organisations

The British Heart Foundation has information about part funding awards for public access defibrillators and training kits. Subject to eligibility, funding is available for non-commercial organisations who will provide unrestricted access to the PAD to members of the public.

The has also awarded grants for AEDs' to voluntary and community organisations. The application process will take 16 weeks if you are successful.

The is supported by the Football Foundation, the FA and Sport England. It aims to support the installation of AEDs and external storage cabinets at thousands of grassroots football facilities who do not currently have an easily accessible device on site.

Public Health Funding

A limited amount of Public Health funding is available to support organisations to obtain a defibrillator. This is subject to certain criteria based on current distribution of defibrillators in areas of highest need.

Normally, we will only fund defibrillators where funding has been sought elsewhere first and not been successful, and if your defibrillator will be publicly accessible.

Please complete an enquiry form to start a conversation.

Frequently asked questions

AED's (Automated External Defibrillator)

What is an AED? 

A defibrillator may also be called an AED (Automated External Defibrillator) or a PAD (Publicly Available Defib). A defibrillator is a device that when utilised gives a high energy electric shock to the heart of an individual who is in cardiac arrest. This action is called defibrillation, and it plays an essential role in trying to save the life of someone who is in cardiac arrest.

Where is my nearest AED?

Please click on the following links to be directed to a map that shows your nearest AED. Please note that not all AED’s will be listed on the maps, may have been removed, or may not be available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

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How can I arrange for an AED to be located close to where I live? 

There are many organisations or charities that are willing to provide funding for an AED. Should your organisation be unsuccessful in a funding application or have a small amount still to raise, 51¥ Public Health has a limited amount of funding to support defibrillator purchase in parts of the county. It will be a requirement of this funding that the local community is supported and encouraged to undertake CPR training. All AEDs funded through this offer must be registered on website. For more information, please check the 'Getting a defibrillator' section on our webpage: Access to CPR and defibrillators

How much does an AED cost?

Depending on the make and model of an AED – the costs can vary – but will be in the region of £500 to £2500. There will also be additional costs of maintaining the AED such as spare batteries and replacement pads.

How do I use an AED?

The use of an AED significantly increases the chance of someone surviving a cardiac arrest. For a detailed guide on how to use an AED – please follow this link:  

How do I maintain an AED?

The maintenance of an AED is essential to ensure it continues to provide a lifesaving service. Things to maintain include new pads, battery and power supply. For a detailed guide on how to maintain an AED – please follow this link:

What are the benefits of an organisation being a guardian of an AED?

By being a guardian, your organisation can save time administering lifesaving help and improve someones chances of survival. Particularly if the AED is located in a residential area where out of hospital cardiac arrests are more likely to occur.

Installing an AED in the workplace is easy, and modern AEDs are simple to use. Your organisation can save the lives of members of the public who may be nearby and the AED is located in a publicly accessible location. An AED in the workplace also offers the opportunity to provide training to employees.

CPR

What is CPR? 

CPR is the process of administering chest compressions with or without rescue breaths. For a detailed guide on how to carry out CPR – please follow this link:

What organisations deliver CPR training?

Some of the organisations that provide CPR training are: , and . For more information, please check their respective websites to learn more.

How much does CPR training cost?

The cost of CPR training can vary. The 15 minute RevivR online course provided by the British Heart Foundation is free of charge and available to all. In person CPR training varies in price according to the type of organisation you are, the number of attendees wish to be on the course, and the training providers cost.

What are the benefits of knowing CPR?

CPR is fast and immediate.  Waiting for a defibrillator without undertaking CPR can cost lives. In the event of a cardiac arrest CPR is always the first action after calling 999. Half of all out of hospital cardiac arrests are witnessed by a bystander, which emphasises the importance of being able to apply CPR whilst waiting for an ambulance/AED. Furthermore, public access AEDs are used in less than 1 in 10 out of hospital cardiac arrests, meaning that knowing how to carry out CPR could save a life.

When do I administer CPR? 

If someone is unconscious and failing to respond, you cannot feel a pulse, and they are not breathing normally. You should call 999 and start CPR straight away.

 

General questions

How many people have a cardiac arrest each year?

The annual incidence of out of hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) is approximately 55 per 100,000 inhabitants. Most of these cardiac arrests occur in adults (98%), amongst whom 62% are aged over 65 years. Most out of hospital cardiac arrests (83.8%) occur in the home/place of residence, 8.6% in public places and 1.5% in workplaces.

What are the signs of a cardiac arrest?

A cardiac arrest is an emergency that usually happens without warning. If someone is in cardiac arrest, they collapse suddenly and:


•    will be unconscious
•    unresponsive
•    not breathing or not breathing normally – this may mean they’re making gasping noises
•    have no pulse

How to lower the risk of having a cardiac arrest?

Your doctor may suggest making lifestyle changes to reduce your risk of having an/another cardiac arrest. This may include:


•    quitting smoking
•    eating a healthy balanced diet
•    cutting down on alcohol consumption
•    being physically active
•    taking prescribed medications and following treatments from your doctor

For more information, please access the following link:

You’re able to get an NHS Health Check to determine your risk of heart disease, kidney disease, stroke and other issues.  If you are aged 40 or over contact your GP to arrange a free NHS Health Check.

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